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Celebrating Vashon’s Japanese and agrarian heritage

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Mukai Open House June 18 and 19, 2016

 

Mukai House 2012

Friends of Mukai will open the historic landmarked Mukai House and Garden for visits from the community on Saturday, June 18th and Sunday, 19th.  The group gained legal ownership of the property April 4th.  They have begun to inventory its contents, clean it up, and develop ways to tell its stories and those of the Mukai family, in preparation for this June ‘soft opening’ .  Friends of Mukai board want to let people see the property as it is now, and have an opportunity to learn more about its history and  the plans for its’ repair and restoration.  A celebration is planned for the fall.  The Mukai home is located at 18017 107th Ave. SW.   It will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Friends of Mukai activities receive support from the 4Culture/King County lodging tax fund.   

 

 

An Interview with Mary Matsuda Gruenewald

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald, who was 90 years old in 2015 when this interview took place, is a retired Seattle health care professional and author of the memoir Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese-American Internment Camps (NewSage Press, 2005).

Mary Matsuda was a 17 year old living on her family's strawberry farm on Vashon Island on December 7, 1941 when Pearl Harbor was attacked. The island's Japanese-American leaders were taken away by the FBI and detained in secret. Her family knew the government would come for them next, so they burned all of their Japanese possessions - family photographs, her father's music, treasured books, even her dolls. They did not want to look even faintly sympathetic to Japan, the country responsible for the Pearl Harbor devastation. Five months after the attack, on May 16, 1942, the Matsuda family and the other Japanese-American families on Vashon Island were forced to evacuate Vashon Island, and moved into the "protective custody" of inland internment camps for three years, along with almost 120,000 others of Japanese descent.

This interview captures parts of Mary's stories that are not fully covered in Looking Like the Enemy, and asks specific questions about her experience on Vashon Island and her knowledge of the Japanese-American community on Vashon before and after World War II.
To view the interview Click Here


We want you to join us to make this happen, because This Place Matters!


This Place Matters

Over 250 members of the Friends of Mukai agree that  This Place Matters.

Please join us.

 

 

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